The Ultimate Alliance: College Football Edition

In an alliance that would surely make Dwight Schrute and Jim Halpert envious, the Big Ten, PAC-12, and ACC are expected to announce next week of such a collaboration.

This is no doubt a reactionary response to the SEC's continued dominance of college football, on and off the playing surface. The SEC nabbed the two biggest names in the Big 12 recently, Oklahoma for their competitiveness and presumably Texas because of their reach and money (no offense, Texas fans).

The story was first broke by The Atlantic (2021), where multiple "sources" are reporting to them that "all three leagues have stressed in recent conversations that issues of governance can and should be front and center" (para. 1).

 

When I hear the word "governance", I can't help but think these three conferences will exclusively play each other in non-conference matchups. This could, in the long run, hinder the SEC's ability to schedule out of conference. As a cynical college football fan against the SEC, I don't see where the change for the SEC will be. They can still schedule those FCS games late in the season. They may, however, need to increase the number of conference games.

I just don't see a scenario where these three conferences align and then still grant non-conference games to the SEC.

This is a developing story and a direct reaction to the SEC and potential Playoff expansion, check back into 12oz Sports for updates!!

 

~Michael Patrick Day, Irish Proud and 12oz Sports Writer

 

Reference

Auerbach, N (2021). Big Ten, Pac-12, ACC alliance expected to be formally announced soon: Sources. The Atlantic. Retrieved https://theathletic.com/news/big-ten-pac-12-acc-alliance-expected-to-be-formally-announced-soon-sources/qQ7aaP9CvLAD

Main Article Photo Credit: scmikeburton on VisualHunt

 

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In an alliance that would surely make Dwight Schrute and Jim Halpert envious, the Big Ten, PAC-12, and ACC are expected to announce next week of such a collaboration. This is no doubt a reactionary response to the SEC's continued dominance of college football, on and off the playing surface. […]